The 1954 Law to be Rolled Back

A group of religious rights has for many years opposed the 1954 law that prohibits churches and nonprofit organizations from engaging in any political activities. The once impossible demands are almost becoming a reality for the group after the Republican representatives began to prepare themselves to rewrite the path of the United States tax code in line with the $1.5 trillion tax package that will move to the Congress. Various amendments were made and passed through the House, among them the provision to scrap off the 1954 ban. Many religious rights support this move, while many of the religious and nonprofit leaders oppose it citing that it will clear the boundary that has existed between politics and charity. The nonpartisan Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation believes that the proposed change will turn the religious houses into fully funded political forces.

About $1.7 billion that comes from the traditional political committee will end up being diverted to the churches. It will also give churches and nonprofit organizations the legal right to practice partisan politics. The Senate vote is scheduled for early midweek. There is a definite variation of the tax rewrite in the Senate from that of the House. For starters, the ban has been left out. The Senate bill has not received sufficient support from the Republicans so that it can pass along party lines. Some Republican senators are concerned about the cost of the law as well as its approach. They are categorically worried about how small enterprises are treated and the scrapping off of the Affordable Care Act requirement that Americans rely on.

In the event that the bill passes in the Senate, the lawmakers will be required to resolve the variation between the House bill and that of the Senate. They will be required to agree on the mode of tax cuts for individuals, whether it will be permanent like it is done in the House or temporally like it is done in the Senate. Those who critics of the repeal of the 1954 Act popularized as the Johnson Amendment say that the change will create untraceable political spending and the creation of churches aimed at taking advantage of the political spending. Religious leaders and denominations say that that the rollback of the Johnson Amendment will be a threat to achieving the mission of their organizations. They also claim that the rollback will bring division in the churches along political affiliation.

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