Dr. Phil’s Son Developing Law School Comedy

CBS is working on a new legal comedy thanks to the contributions of Jay McGraw and his famous father, Phil McGraw. The pair are working on a comedy based on the younger McGraw’s experiences in law school. Jay McGraw is a graduate of SMU Law in Dallas, Texas.

McGraw’s comedy centers on a young law student. The student comes from a privileged background, and he wants an easy experience in law school. Unfortunately, he chooses one of the best law schools in the country. The law school has high expectations. Despite his attempts to slide through school on easy street, the student finds that he has to work hard and represent clients in actual cases.

The show’s developers plan to call the show “Class Action.” Modern Family writer Dan O’Shannon plans to contribute to the project. CBS plans to produce the show. Jay McGraw isn’t new to writing. He previously published “Jay McGraw’s Life Strategies for Dealing with Bullies.” He also appeared on the show “Renovate My Family” as the show’s host.

McGraw graduated from SMU’s Dedman School of Law in 2004. SMU Law is located in Dallas, Texas. The school consistently boasts above-average bar passage rates in the State of Texas. Reviewing organizations typically rank the school around the top 50 for law schools in the United States.

SMU Law offers a full-time program that takes three years. They also offer a part-time, evening program that lasts four years. Famous SMU Law alumni include U.S. Supreme Court nominee Harriet Myers and James Baker, a justice of the Texas Supreme Court. The law school sits on the north side of downtown Dallas between Highland Park and University Park.

True of the younger McGraw’s recollection, the school offers law students an intensive clinical experience. Students can choose between participation in the criminal clinic, child advocacy program, innocence project, family law assistance program and civil law clinic. The law school sits on SMU’s main campus. Students may also participate in moot court and law review programs.

The McGraws operate their creative projects through Stage 29 Productions. If the project gathers steam, it won’t be the first time that Dr. Phil has lent his creativity to a law-related comedy. The company has also produced a show called Bull. That show is based on Dr. Phil’s experiences running a trial consulting firm before his years as Dr. Phil. Before he became Dr. Phil, he also appeared on Oprah and contributed to her defense against a defamation lawsuit brought by the cattle industry.

Three Dallas Police Officers Charged in Man’s Death

There’s no question that Tony Timpa was high on cocaine on August 10 of 2016 when he phoned 911 for help. He was overdosed, but he was unarmed. He wanted help, but within an hour after the police arrived, Tony Timpa was dead.

The Dallas Morning News reports that a “beefy” Timpa parked his Mercedes Benz in the parking lot of an adult store on West Mockingbird Lane and called for help. Police officers allegedly mocked the 32-year-old Timpa when he died after 14 minutes of an officer’s knee was pinned in his back. Two Dallas police officers aged 48 and 32 were indicted on misdemeanor charges of deadly conduct in Timpa’s death. Another unnamed Dallas police officer has been charged, but he has yet to turn himself in.

Timpa’s mother indicated that she didn’t understand why the officers were only charged with misdemeanors rather than felonies. Misdemeanors only involve the possibility of a 364 day jail sentence. Timpa’s mother said that she wanted to see the accused officers go to jail for so long that they’d “smell the rust on the bars.” Dallas Police Department officials have refused to release body camera footage that was allegedly recorded that night by at least one of the indicted police officers. Timpa’s mother wants to see it. The Dallas Police Department has also failed to comment on whether any of the indicted police officers have been disciplined.

The Dallas Morning News has sought information regarding the death of Tony Timpa for more than a year. Timpa had apparently told 911 operators that he feared for his safety, and suffered from anxiety and schizophrenia and had not taken his prescription medications. He was in shorts and barefoot. No weapons were found on or near him. It’s alleged that Timpa repeatedly begged the police officers on the scene not to hurt him. It’s further alleged that police officers remained on top of Timpa after he had lost consciousness and was rendered harmless. One of the officers reportedly stated on camera that he hoped that he didn’t kill Timpa. Tony Timpa’s death was ruled a homicide due to the ingestion of cocaine and the stress involved in the occurrence.

The whereabouts of the third officer involved in Timpa’s death are still unknown. It’s also unknown whether the misdemeanor charges against the three officers will be upgraded to felonies.

Sujit Choudhry and Geography’s Threat to Democracy

Sujit Choudhry is the founding director of the Center for Constitutional Transitions and an internationally recognized authority on comparative constitutional law and politics. The focus of his research spans across a wide variety of comparative constitutional law and politics issues. In 2014, he and his colleague, Michael Pal from the University of Ottawa – Common Law Section; Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation, published an article in the Canadian Political Science Review. The article, Still Not Equal? Visible Minority Vote Dilution in Canada, discusses voting power for visible and non-visible minorities for the 2004 federal electoral map as well as for provincial electoral districts in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. The major conclusion was that the concept of vote dilution is prominent in regions of visible minorities.

Sujit Choudhry’s Address at the Semi-Presidentialism Round-table in Ukraine

The democratic political power path is bifurcated. One side is demography, or satisfying interests and beliefs of the largest group of people and winning their votes. The other path is geography, referring to securing voters in the many regions that are scarcely populated. In other words, by focusing on the geography principle, this bifurcation enables the adoption of public policies that are not always appealing to the majority. At the moment, the majority of the democratic world is largely based on geographic rather than demographic politics.

 

The most famous example of this is the situation in the United States, where both the presidency as well as the Senate can be won via geography rather than demography. The effect of geography is especially evident in the fact that despite a strong majority of the American people having liberal, racially tolerant and international-minded views, they have been overpowered by a faction of the Republican Party that is associated with U.S. President Donald Trump.

 

Even back in 2010, at a time when the broad center-left voting coalition under the former U.S. president Barack Obama seemed to dominate U.S. politics, Joel Kotkin of the conservative American Enterprise Institute prognosticated that, “Demographics may seem a long-term boon for Democrats,” he wrote, “but geographic trends tilt in the opposite direction.” This became evident in the victory of President Trump who was favored by the increasingly non-diverse, older populations residing in the underpopulated center. Even though the vast majority voted against him, out of the 592 counties that supported him, 520 were populated by fewer than 50,000 individuals, and won almost every county populated by fewer than 10,000 individuals.

 

This problem spans beyond the American borders, too. Europe is affected by fringe parties of intolerance and in some cases a parliamentary majority via the geography approach. The extreme-right Alternative for Germany that had a strong showing in October’s national election was in large part due to focus on the sparse and depopulated regions of former communist East Germany. Poland is another example, whose Law and Justice Party governs after appealing more to rural areas by turning nationalist and xenophobic. France, too, played the geography card when its National Front made it to the first round of presidential elections.

 

Canada is also not immune to this threat to democracy when leaders with fringe ideas take power by appealing to underpopulated regions of the country. The Canadian democratic system is most vulnerable due to the great imbalance between rural and urban as well as suburban ridings, the latter two of which are more densely populated. While the 2011 Fair Representation Act added equality to Canada’s provinces by introducing 30 new ridings, rural overrepresentation remained unaddressed.

 

This is where the study by Choudhry and Pal is of such importance. According to their findings, introducing new ridings had two downsides. Not only did those rural ridings have more voting power, but Canadians from racial-minority backgrounds living in metropolitan areas were severely underrepresented. The researchers found that for every Canadian’s vote power of 1, those in ridings that are more than 99% white have a voting power of 1.37. Canadians who reside in ridings that are more than 30% non-white have a voting power of 0.88. This means that the electoral clout of voters residing in all-white ridings is 55% higher than that of voters in diverse ridings. The scholars refer to this concept as vote dilution that is present among the diverse ridings. It carries particular demographic, policy and constitutional considerations significance, and the scholars conclude their study by highlighting that a reform is critical.

 

Overall, it is the moderate parties that must work on winning back geography. The inherent struggle that America’s Democrats are facing is the discrepancy between geography voters in the northern states, who felt that their candidate while too liberal on social issues, and those who are in safe Democratic urban districts thought the opposite. As the term ‘too liberal’ has many meanings, the solution to this may be in delivering different election-year messages and not focusing on changing policies. However, the overall conclusion of the 2016 U.S. election is that the in-between places must not be ignored as there is a method to win for a party that is ready to bet on symbolic resentments and fears of residents in scarcely populated areas.

 

Sujit Choudhry is the founding director of the Center for Constitutional Transitions and I. Michael Heyman Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. He works as constitutional advisor to emerging democracies across the world. He is currently also a member of the United Nations Mediation Roster and was a consultant to the World Bank Institute at the World Bank and the United Nations Development Program.

 

Choudhry has also been a constitutional advisor for over two decades. He has expertise in facilitating public dialogue sessions with civil society groups and other stakeholders, leading stakeholder consultations, performing detailed advisory work with technical experts, training civil servants and bureaucrats, engaging party leaders and parliamentarians, and drafting technical reports and memoranda in the field. He is currently also a member of the United Nations Mediation Roster and consultant to the World Bank Institute at the World Bank and the United Nations Development Program.

 

His publication record includes over ninety articles, book chapters, working papers and reports. He is author of several books and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Society of Public Law, the International Advisory Council of the Institute for Integrated Transitions, the Scientific Advisory Board of the International Journal of Constitutional Law, the Editorial Board of the Constitutional Court Review, the Editorial Advisory Board for the Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law, and is an Honorary Member of the Advisory Council of the Indian Constitutional Law Review. More information on Sujit Choudhry can be found on his personal website sujitchoudhry.com as well as on LinkedIn, Twitter (@sujit_choudhry), Instagram (@sujitchoudhry) and on Facebook.