Tinder Wages Suit Against Bumble In Court Of Law

Tinder has penetrated – no pun intended at first, but now that I’ve recognized it, I’ll keep it and say the pun was – the dating market as its most popular mobile app in recent years, itself being one of the most popular apps, overall.

On Friday, March 16, 2018, fellow dating mobile app competitor Bumble found itself on the receiving end of a lawsuit waged by Tinder executives for robbing it of trade secrets.

The case has been filed in Texas, claiming that Bumble ripped Tinder’s “left-swipe, right-swipe” mechanism off, with Tinder being the first in the dating industry to use the simple, yet popular, technology.

Bumble has also been claimed by lawyers representing Tinder to be nearly congruent to Tinder’s app, itself the most popular in the world of dating services. The suit seems to have a strong basis in United States courts of law, as Bumble was created in 2014 by people who used to work for Tinder.

What sets Bumble apart from Tinder, and, by extension, the rest of the world of dating services, is that only females are authorized to make first moves within the app, meaning only females can initiate contact between themselves and potential dates.

Whitney Wolfe Herd was the first employee to leave Tinder that went on to fund Tinder. Bumble was founded in 2014, the same year Ms. Herd left the large dating app company, immediately after winning a lawsuit for sexual harassment and discrimination for a whopping $1 million.

Sarah Mick and Christ Gulczynski joined Herd at Bumble prior to its launch in December 2014, with all three claiming themselves to be cofounders of the company. Bumble – effectively Herd and company – executives claim that Bumble is unique because it requires women to make the first move, whereas no other dating app or online service did the same thing at the time, in December 2014, when it was founded.

Match Group, the parent company of Tinder, claims the left-swipe, right-swipe mechanism is now the very first case of Tinder suing over arguably the main thing that makes Tinder, Tinder.

The corporation also owns dating sites like OkCupid, Plenty of Fish, Badoo, and Match.com, each of which competes for the top spot in the world of dating services on the world wide web. Dating websites rarely find themselves in such legal fiascos, though the Bumble lawsuit could set precedents for coming cases.

 

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