The United States Supreme Court Allows the Execution of a Man who can’t remember his Crime

The United States Supreme Court yesterday ruled that the execution of an Alabama man who cannot remember his crime should go ahead. He has been on death row since 1985 for first-degree murder. The Supreme Court issued a statement later saying that the decision was unanimous. This was an indication that there were no noted dissents. However, the three judges of the Supreme Court who are known for their liberal opinions released a statement saying that the case brought before the court a good legal question. They further said that it was their opinion that the matter should be brought to the court at a later date. The inmate, in this case, has been identified as Vernon Madison. The Times learned that he has been on death row since he was convicted for killing Julius Schulte. The Supreme Court case was based on a request that Mr. Madison made in 2016 on a trial court in Alabama. He asked the court to suspend the decision to execute him because he could not remember why he was being punished. This is an opinion that Justice Stephen G. Breyer agreed on. He later described the condition of the inmate. He described Mr. Madison as legally blind.

At the same time, Justice Stephen G.Breyer said that the inmate could neither walk independently nor talk like a normal person as his speech was slurred. The inmate was inconsistent. The Justice said that the current condition of Mr. Madison means that he didn’t have a memory of the capital offense. Two court-appointed psychologists agreed that the inmate understood that he knew about what he had been accused off. At the same time, he knew of the measures that the state planned on using to punish him. One psychologist had been appointed by the court while the other was appointed by Mr. Madison. Before the case made its way to the United States Supreme Court, a state trial judge ruled that the execution should take place. When the case proceeded to a federal court, the judges agreed with the state judges. However, the United States Court of Appeals would not agree with the previous judges. The court determined that executing a person who would not remember his crime would be violating the United States Constitution. At the same time, the court argued that the United States Supreme Court had ruled that a person who has no rational understanding should not be executed.

Videos About Law:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *