Will California’s Public Workers’ Unions Frustrate United States Supreme court’s decision?

Diana Corral, a soft-spoken young lady who is aged 36 years, doesn’t even look fit to be a County social worker. She even hardly fits into the typical pedigree of being a county boss. She is reported to love her job so much because she enjoys helping people. She is considered a helper who likes guiding the poor, the homeless and the disabled. She assists them in securing food stamps, cash assistance, medical care and insurance. Diana Corral is among the army that is on the warpath in California to stand against the effects of Wednesday’s Supreme Court decision. The protestors were trying to overturn the decision that was passed by the Supreme Court that seemed not be in their favor. They intended to outlaw the so-called fair share that was being taxed by the government unions.

The levies that are paid by employees that later decline to join the government unions have offset the collective bargaining costs. Unions are involuntary asked to represent the ‘free riders’. Experts have foreseen the extensive issues of dues-paying members. This has, in turn, crippled the labor movement. However, in California, there are 1.5 million union-protected public workers and also a labor-friendly council. That supposition might be incorrect. Corral reported that the Janus case had sparkled an issue in the workers. The employees have been sitting seeing the inequity, the rich continuing to be rich while the poor have grown to be poorer. Corral revealed that it was the moment for the working class American citizens to stand up and fight for the little that they have left.

According to her tone, Corral seemed more renewed and with energy. She meant a new action team for all the fourteen work sites. She asked all her colleagues to sign commitment cards. She reported that the cards had been approved by over 90% of her work members. She intended to legally re-enrol them for another year. If they were re-enrolled, it meant that they had to bargain their contracts. The cards were more significant as they represented the statewide representation of the worker’s plea. They were to push for a change after the Supreme Court passed a law that seemed not to favour them. She urged her work members to open their eyes and see what was happening. The court’s decisions was a wakeup call for them. It was a signal to the entire labour movement that had to fight for their rights so that the court can prioritize their demands.

Read Full Report: https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article214022469.html

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